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Wild Boar Cooking Primer

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From the "Meat Man"-Here is his link (good): "Ask the Meat Man" Link

 

Cooking Wild Boar Meat

Wild boar is lean meat that should, as a rule, be cooked at lower temperatures than other meats. Avoid overcooking. Wild boar, raised like beef, is range fed and therefore can be served on the rare side. A rule of thumb for cooking wild boar is "low and slow". The temperature for cooking roasts for example, is 250-275 degrees Fahrenheit. The amount of time depends on your personal preference as to how well done you would like to cook your meat. For chops, bake with a sauce for best results or if you prefer, pan-fry at a medium heat. Always check frequently so as not to overcook.

 

Wild boar is excellent barbecued. When prepared properly it is flavorful and very tender. Wild boar also makes tasty sausage, jerky and ground meat products.

 

When preparing wild boar for cooking remember, never thaw or cook this meat in a microwave, as it will become very tough and dry. Slowly thaw meat the day before and marinate overnight for best results. Pineapple juice or wine is a particularly good choice for marinade because it contains an enzyme that actively breaks down muscle fiber. Therefore it is highly effective as a meat tenderizer.

 

The wild boar’s light fat layer can be easily trimmed. But many cooks believe the fat layer provides a "self-basting" element and helps retain succulence.

 

 

Smoking (slow cooking Quarters or Wild Boar Hogs)

 

This is the most common and preferred way for preparing wild pork. Usually to be served at friend and family get-togethers.

First of all read the tips and reminders and apply those to those tips in preparing the meat for best results.

 

Gather your favorite seasonings such as lemons, peppers, onions, potatoes, and any other seasonings that suit your taste and get that part taken care of.

 

Completely wrap the meat so the vapors are locked in as well as possible and the drippings will not escape.

 

Slow smoke (or bake) at about 275 - 300 degrees turning or rotating as needed to insure even cooking. The time will vary greatly depending on the size.

 

Whole hogs should cook overnight or all day. Quarters will usually cook in 5 - 6 hours.

 

 

 

 

WILD MEAT SOAK and TENDERIZER

 

Skin and Debone or Quarter the animals out and place the meat in a large ice chest with the following mixture:

 

ICE WATER!! Along with ½ cup of vinegar and a medium or large (18 - 20 oz) size container or real lemon juice.

 

Soak large portions of meat for 2 or even 3 days - changing the water as needed and keeping the water ICE COLD and all meat covered with the ice water. Soak the meat till it turns white and all blood is leached out.

 

NOTE, if the meat begins to darken or turn blue then you got too much vinegar! The meat is not spoiled!! Change the ice water and reduce or eliminate the vinegar.

 

 

Nutrition Table

Typical values based on per 100g portion

 

Wild Boar Recipes

Wild Boar Chops in Beer

 

Dredge wild boar chops in a mixture of flour, salt, and pepper

Brown dredged wild boar chops in 2 tbsp. of hot oil

Drain grease, saving brown bits. Mix brown bits, 1 bottle beer, 1 tbsp mustard, 1 tsp chopped/crushed garlic, 1 cup beef broth; mix & simmer for 15 minutes

Place chops in baking pan, pour sauce over chops.; cover pan and place in oven at 300 degrees F, bake for 45 minutes.

Enjoy

Quick And Easy Battered Chops

 

The loins or backstrap or used for this dish.

Remember the tips and trim all fat and gristle from the portions.

Take the backstraps and slice it into 1/3 of an inch thick chops.

Salt and pepper or season the chops to your liking.

Prepare to dip the chops in one cup milk and one egg mixed together.

The chops will then be placed and rolled in flour.

Then drop them in some hot grease. Won't take long to cook if completely covered with grease, maybe 5 minutes.

Cook till no red juices are left in the meat and the outside is browned.

Serve with southern gravy, bread and vegetables.

To make it even quicker you can simply season the chops and drop them in a frying pan with bacon grease.

Cook till slightly brown and serve same as above.

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Great Website Bob!!

 

Thanks,

 

Dave :cool:

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Good information.

 

I'm no expert, but those temperatures sound terribly high. But then again some of the best BBQ in the Lone Star State is cooked at 600 degrees. According to "Legends of Texas Barbecue", in the days of the open pit where cooking was done over hardwood coals for 12-24 hours, temperatures had to be low (200-250) to keep meat from catching fire.

 

The key is knowing how to tell when it's done. Beware of USDA internal temperatures, as they error on the side of food safety at the expense of quality. They are a good 10 to 15 degrees higher than the temperatures used at most restaurants. Some of the best methods are the inexact ones that involve poking, prodding, and sniffing at it. I think the key for pork is that the juices should run clear when you poke it.

 

Does anyone here have any firsthand experience with whole or quartered wild hogs?

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Maddog50,

 

I have a little experience in smoking half or whole wild hogs. It is a rare occassion that I get to use a smoker with a working termastat. We generally slow cooked them over mesquite coals for 8-10 hours, depending on the size of the hog AND the number of hogs we would have cooking at the same time. We cooked for the 2nd and 3rd Rendevous and if there were any complaints, I never heard them.

 

clrforkmeal.jpg

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Dang Capt...that picture makes me hungry enuff to kill for some of it about now. Shouldn't do that to us wild pig meat deprived folks.

 

clrforkmeal.jpg

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Is that "ice water and vinegar" soak supposed to be done before freezing it right after you dress it? Will it help any if you do it after thawing it right before smoking it?

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Bob, this is an old sticky, but I have a question.

 

I've got 2 hams that were "cured" from the processor, along with packages of chops and one of spare ribs. They were part of a kill I took and the buddies I was with dropped off for me at the processor with theirs, rather than skinning it out and processing it ourselves (no facility as I was out of town)... anyway, long story short...

 

These frozen items, once thawed, can be drained as in the method you mentioned, and work fine? The last couple of chops and the ribs especially were sorely tough, as the sausage that we have. I noticed that they are awefully dark, quite dark in fact they remind me of buffalo... that means there's too much blood in this pink meat... a fresh kill I made a couple of weeks ago was pink as the store bought kind (and still twitching when backstrapped).

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It should work just fine. Just don't try to re-freeze any of it.

 

Bob orangehat.gif

 

 

That's funny! LOL... my wife asked me when we first got married if it was alright, and I replied politely, only if you cook it and plan on eating the leftovers ;) (in regards to anything meat). I copy the "don't try to re-freeze any of it" part. Thanks for the info. I'll apply this to my cook books so anyone else that asks, can do the same.

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Wow .. Im Cooking 2 whole animals for new years. I slow smoke hog whole and will smoke the deer quartered. I like the vinigar soak idea and other mentions. These animals will be a fresh kill to the grill, so I wont have time to soak and doctor too much except for seasoning. Slow cook all day will be the way.

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I normally cook mine about 225 degrees plus/minus till it falls apart....backstrap has to be watched so that it doesn't overcook...I found some stuff from Uncle Henry's called Pig Rub that works pretty well....also use Cavenders Greek Seasoning....and Mojave Garlic powder...just my .02

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Tinker, love the signature,but like Clint Smith rule #4 I believe-"Cheat".

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