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Fear of Hogpocalypse

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Just ran across this story today. The TX Ag Comm., Sid Miller, has approved the use of hog attractants with poison in an effort to stem the tide of feral hog destruction.

 

Link to the story: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/fearing-feral-hog-apocalypse-texas-approves-drastic-measures/ar-AAnbswK?ocid=spartanntp

 

The cynic in me finds it interesting that a company I have never heard of produces a hog attractant, again, one I have never heard of, laced with poison and receives single billing in the story.

 

Link to the company: http://www.kaputproducts.com/solutions-by-pest-type/feral-hog/

 

The company is located, in the middle of nowhere, North of Ft. Collins, CO between there and Cheyenne, WY. The shipping logistics alone would make the product too expensive.

 

Sid Miller makes it sound like the State of Texas will be buying Kaput bait, which according the web site is "coming soon", to use. Really curious to know how Mr. Miller plans on keeping other wildlife from eating the poison. Wonder if there was an open bid for that project? Would probably be very interesting to connect the dots and follow the money...

 

The Texas Hog Hunters Association is listed as the opposition in the article. Was not aware of that organization but will be joining.

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Read on another forum that the active ingredient is warfarin, the objective is for the beasts to bleed to death internally. Will this go up the food chain? What about those folks that trap hogs and sell them? Can't see packers buying hogs which may have poison in them and haven't died yet. Archie

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From Cornell University (Remember...the farmer didn't even ingest it, just touched it while putting out poisons. And this is a lower dose for small rodents, not the more toxic levels for hogs):

 

A farmer whose hands were intermittently wetted with a 0.5% solution of warfarin over a period of 24 days developed gross hematuria two days after the last contact with the solution; the following day, spontaneous hematomas appeared on the arms and legs. Within four days, there were also epistaxis, punctate hemorrhages of the palate and mouth, and bleeding from the lower lip. The bleeding time was over 30 minutes; the clotting time was 11 minutes and 30 seconds; the prothrombin index was 17; and the prothrombin percentage (thrombotest) was 5.

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One other thing: ALL studies agree that warfarin does not break down, does cause secondary poisoning and has a "high mammalian toxicity." Tertiary poisoning is even a likely scenario.

 

And what about the family who kills, butchers and eats a hog that -- unbeknowst to them -- had ingested the warfarin-laced bait?

 

Yes, hogs are a problem, but warfarin is NOT the solution.

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This plan reminds me of the Oklahoma plan to release panthers in the state to reduce the ferel hog population. Problem was, nobody told the panthers to ONLY eat hogs. So there was a negative impact on cattle, sheep and deer. This program has been denied/dismissed by the state as a urban legend but those pesky sitings and pictures continue to come in...

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Not advocating for this but this dose is 1/5th of what they use in rat poisoning. 0.005 is what the hog bait has. I have read the EPA's 9 page brochure and it lists all of these precautions. How to handle the poison and dispose of the dead pigs. Scares me. Says it's safe but have to remove your cattle for 90 days. Doesn't sound safe to me but at least two of my landowners are ready to use it as a tool in addition to our continued hunting.

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and dispose of the dead pigs...... Says it's safe but have to remove your cattle for 90 days..... use it as a tool in addition to our continued hunting.

Three points on that: 1) not all the dead pigs will be found; 2) Move the cattle where? Not all cattle farmers have an extra 300 acres to move them to; 3) This may eliminate your keeping any of the hogs for butchering you kill...that would be quite a chance to take, if any of the earlier posts here are even near correct.

 

Again, I'm surprised the EPA is even sanctioning this with all those warnings. I would be interested to know how much each bait station will cost for the Warfarin. My wife takes Xarelto, which is similar in many respects to Warfarin, and it costs well over $150 for a month's supply of 30 small pills in it's reduced power form. So far it sounds both expensive and dangerous, and certain to impact neighboring land tracts that may not buy into this by the hogs making it under the fence to them before they die. Could set up some interesting law suits down the road. I don't foresee any of this affecting the area I hunt, but it is possible. Maybe a better answer would be to open up their lands to Posse members only, and let the Posse take care of their problem. (Do I hear an "amen" to that?) Will be interesting to see how this plays out, both for the hogs and for the landowners.

 

OP

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The fact that cattle have to be removed for 90 days tells you all you need to know about warfarin. It is no secret that it has a high mammalian toxicity. It is a disaster waiting to happen.

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