Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Bobby Tomek

7-30 Waters takes another boar/bullet & "shield" pics also

Recommended Posts

hog-2-feb3-2017-LOWREZ-text_zpslfh4abjm.
shield_zpsczpfm24w.jpg
nosler-7mm-120-recovered_zpsblxgbfrx.jpg

After a miserable start to the day, things got progressively better this evening -- enough so that I felt well enough to step outside with the 24" 7-30 Waters and see if a hog had finally decided to show itself. We've been seeing rooting for nearly a week in the neighbor's field but hadn't spotted any swine around here. It was only a matter of time...

A short while after the 10:00 news ended, I stepped out to my shooting rest and switched on the KillZone light. Nothing but a large 'coon and a possum could be seen. So I meandered over to the other side of the yard, laid the rifle across the rest there and flipped the switch. I immediately saw a hog, but he was facing me and caught the brunt of the light in his face, and even though the green LEDs tend to make game less skittish, he took off.

So I swung the light well ahead of him with hopes he'd run through the beam and give me an opportunity. It worked out even better than I had hoped. As he hit the fringe of the beam, he was broadside and slowed to a walk. I was about to take a shot as he turned and angled sharply for a quartering presentation, which I quickly took as he was nearing the brushline and about to be gone for good.

From 170 yards, I could hear the impact of the 120 grain Ballistic Tip as it pulverized his shoulder, ripped through the vitals and penetrated the 2nd to last rib before stopping under the hide, where it was easily recovered.

The recovered Ballistic Tip, which starts out at a mild 2655 fps, weighed 86.1 grains. The core and the jacket were actually separated and found less than an inch from each other, but I am thrilled with the performance considering the hard impact and the fact that it penetrated close to 18 inches before coming to rest.

I've also included a photo of the "shield" as I often get asked about it and whether or not it is just a myth. It is not. This boar was not very old and already had a substantial layer of cartilage covering his shoulder area. I cut away a section from where the bullet entered and also a section from where the bullet ended up. Notice the huge difference. On an old boar, that layer of cartilage can approach an inch and in thickness and will test the mettle of any bullet.

PS-Before anyone asks, the light is usually on the left side of the scope due to the Butler Creek covers. To be seen in the photo, I flipped it to the upright position.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good narrative, Bobby. Like the picture of the expended bullet, too. Didn't know what I was looking at on the hog until I read your account of what you had done.

 

OP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear you were able to get out and have some fun. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those shields will certainly mess up a good shot from an arrow , I try and catch them at an angle when using a bow . Great story as always .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, guys. Bennie, you are right about that shield. About 15 years ago, I shot an old boar that had what appeared to be a .22 LR fully mushroomed and not quite all the way through the shield. The bullet seemed to have gone a bit sideways in it (maybe an angled shot?) but went less than 1.5" total. I remember wondering what was going on in that spot because when skinning it, you could see an unusual bluish-gray discoloration for a couple inches either side of the spot.

 

Anyway, it just goes to show how solid they really are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×