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GonHuntin

6mm TCU 6x45 on deer??

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Anyone used a 6TCU or 6x45 (6mm/223) on deer?? I have an 18" TC Custom Shop contender barrel in 6mm TCU in the back of the safe and thought it might be something that would work. I have read that the 70 grain ballistic tip is sufficient for smaller deer, but I've never tried it.

 

Anybody have any experience doing this??

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Yes, I have. My first custom pistol was an XP with a 14" Shilen barrel chambered in 6mm-.223 (6x45). It was incredibly accurate, and I used it on everything from vermin and varmints to deer-sized game. Most were taken with the long-discontinued 80 grain Sierra SSP pushed to right at 2700 fps using H335 .

 

With current bullets, the 70 grain Nosler you mention will work fine, as will the 80 grain BT (assuming it's twisted fast enough to handle it) and the Sierra 80 grain Varminter, which is constructed very similarly to the SSP I used and will expand down to 1750 fps.

 

I used the little 85 grain Partition, but I wasn't happy with the lack of tissue destruction compared to the Sierra, though it gave textbook mushrooms in test media.

 

I later even had a customized 788 and a couple of Contender barrels in 6-.223 and for a while a 22" Contender in 6mm TCU. All proved superbly accurate, and that mild recoil is a nice feature as well. The TCU barrel coincided with the availability of the 80 grain BT, and it always put them into tiny little groups. I didn't take any deer with that bullet, but it proved to be a good performer on coyotes and always exited, leaving nice, wide wound channels in its wake.

 

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No problem. Paul (waterbug) got that same message several days ago. I am not sure why. Bob recommended clearing cookies, which I did last week. You can e-mail me: btomekATgvecDOTnet

 

In the mean time, I'll try and see what's going on with the messages.

 

EDITED TO ADD: I think I fixed the problem. The problem was ME ha ha. I had a total of 50 messages in my folder, and that's the limit. I deleted most of them. It should work now. Sorry about that!!!

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For what it's worth, I found some of my old notes on the 22" 6TCU that I had and saw I took at least two hogs with the 80 grain Nosler BT and a mild load that developed right at 2775 fps from the 22" barrel. One was a 120 pound sow taken at 80 yards with a tight, behind-the-shoulder shot. The bullet exited through the center of the opposite-side shoulder, and the exit was about the size of a nickel.

 

The other was a pure lung shot (ribs only bones impacted) on a 165 pound boar, and the range was around 180 yards. The exit was tight behind the opposite shoulder and about the size of a nickel as well.

 

The sow dropped on the spot. The boar went 35-40 yards before folding.

 

I have more notes somewhere -- just haven't located them yet.

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Well, the 6mm TCU got it done.

 

My nephew brought his 11 year old son to my place this week to try to get his first deer during our "holiday antlerless season". Wednesday evening, he made a 75 yard shot on a yearling doe and got the job done.

I chose the TCU for this hunt because the young hunter is pretty small for his age and, although he has experience behind a .223, we were concerned about recoil of a larger rifle.....and......I really wanted to see how the TCU worked on deer! The load was 21.5 grains of IMR 4198 pushing a 70 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip, I haven't chronograph the load yet, but it should be making about 2700 fps. He hit the deer at the front of the right shoulder and it exited through the opposite shoulder leaving a "Ray Charles" blood trail (even a blind man could have followed it :D). The doe went about 75 yards and crashed.
Although a yearling doe isn't much of a test, I was impressed at the damage the little 70 grain ballistic tip did. It missed bone on entry but broke the leg bone at the bottom of the scapula and still exited.
No photos this time since he isn't my child and I didn't ask if I could post his photo.

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Mark:

 

Can you post a picture of the 6mm TCU that you are using? I've never even heard of one, let alone seen one, or the bullet it shoots.

 

Jerry

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Mark-Kudos for helping that kiddo get a deer. Your choice of gun/caliber/load was a terrific one -- as the results show. Given modest speeds, the solid bases on the BTs allow them to penetrate surprisingly well and often better than comparable cup-and-core projectiles.

 

Jerry-When he posts a photo, you are going to hate yourself for asking because you WILL want one ha ha! It's a cute and efficient little cartridge.

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Bobby, I have killed a bunch of coyotes with the 6mm 70 grain ballistic tip from a 243, sometimes with devastating results. I am a big fan of ballistic tips in general and was glad to see the little 70 grain stay together......of course I wasn't surprised since you had already traveled that road and confirmed it would work!

 

 

Jerry, this is a 6TCU beside a .223 for reference. It is very easy to form the case, simply neck the .223 case to 6mm and fireform to final shape.....even the fireforming loads are accurate. I sighted the rifle 1" high at 75 yards, would have sighted it in at 100 but it is wearing a fixed 4 power scope and my eyes aren't young.......at 75 yards, it put 3 in less than 1".

 

 

 

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Contender carbine with 18" 6mm TCU barrel from the Thompson Center custom shop. Looks larger in the photo because the deer is so small, the rifle is really tiny and very light, around 36" overall length. Recoil with the load I used is nearly nonexistent and it can be pushed much harder than I did for this hunt.

 

 

30988389594_224a7f3512_b.jpg

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Slicker......I greatly enjoy helping people get their first deer, this is the 4th one I have assisted with in the last few years, second one this year. Seeing their excitement when they succeed is priceless to me.

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That rig looks like a perfect set-up to move a kid up to after he or she has gotten used to the .22 LR. The next caliber I have up from the .22 is the .243, and while mild by comparison to other calibers, it still has a little kick to it. I can see where that little gun could bridge the gap nicely. And yes, Bobby, it makes me covetous this close to Christmas. I really like the looks of the 6mmTCU alongside the .223.

Since I've already shown my ignorance on the subject, I'll add to it: is this a round you can buy at a sporting goods store, or do all of the loads have to be necked-up and fire-formed? One final one: I assume the TC stands for Thompson Center or Contender. What does the U stand for?

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The 6mm TCU is a wildcat round, don't know of any factory loaded ammo for it??

 

TCU stands for Thompson Center Ugalde, here is some info:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thompson/Center_Ugalde

 

You can certainly download the 243 to lower velocity/recoil levels but the Contender carbine fits small kids better. I started my youngest son on this carbine with a 7-30 Waters barrel, he killed his first 2 deer with it. The 7-30 Waters is a fantastic round for the contender but recoil is much higher than the 6mm TCU.

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Jerry-If you want to keep it simple, the 6mm-.223 (a.k.a. 6x45) is nothing but the .223 case run into a 6-.223 die to open the neck. It is the ballistic twin of the TCU. The TCU was designed with the Contender in mind, though, as the straighter side walls "grip" the chamber of the single shot better (reducing backthrust against the frame) while the case design itself minimizes case stretch.

 

I like them equally well.

 

Oh, and like Mark mentioned, the fireforming loads for the TCU can be nearly as potent as full-out hunting loads and often group just as well, too.

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