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skosler

Green or red light ?

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I'm sure it's posted in here somewhere, but I can't find it.

 

I think I read some where that people "scan" with a red light and shoot with a green light? Somewhere I read that yotes might be scared of a green light, but not a red?

 

Does anyone both scan and shoot with a green light? I'm just worried about it being too bright. I am referring to the latest high intensity LED "Laser" lights..

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I scanned and shot with red for years and years. Then I got a green Kill Light, and I scan and hunt with it! I'll also scan with a large, white spotlight when I'm in a "bean field" situation, to help with the initial pick up at very long ranges. The big spotlight will burn your retinas, but I've never seen any indication that it was too bright and scaring off the animals I was tracking with it. There's other folks on the Forum with a lot more experience than I have who will chime in once they've got their morning coffee fix taken care of.

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I still prefer red for predators, but honestly have not found any difference. Green will reach farther all other things being equal.

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I use a green light for spotting hogs (in Germany, it´s not allowed to have it attached to the gun, and it´s not allowed to use it for shooting :unsure: ), but well...

 

I watched hogs, roe deer, badgers, foxes, hares etc with green light, sometimes for quite a while and they never seemed to bother - most of the times, they "ran away" when I made some noise or found something more interesting than what was in front of their noses...

 

With red light, I have no experience - due to my very positive experiences with green, I never tried, maybe I should!-)

 

Blue light is supposed to be scary for any kind of game, thus we have blue reflectors attached to poles next to streets with a higher risk of accidents - it seems to work quite well, they are widespread around German roads... So don´t use it!-)))

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I have both red and green wicked lights and we use the green most of the time. We use the red when looking for predators. I just got the W5 ambush light so we haven't had a lot of time with it yet. The green will reflect the pigs eyes when nothing else does. The green light has a denser beam so it shines further.

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Have any of you guys had predators run off when a green light hits them in the eyes? A buddy of mine had both a red and green light for his rifles. He was calling one night and had a fox coming in really well, but when the shooter hit it with the green light it turned straight away and ran off. He said on the next stand they used the red light and didn't have any issues. Is there any truth to this or was it something else that cause the fox to leave? Thanks.

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I watched all kind of game with my green light (don´t have a red one) and neither boars, roe deers nor foxes were scared away by the light - most of the time, they either got my scent or heard something.

Last year, I was out with my daughter - I called a fox to ten yards in front of our treehouse and to show her the fox, I lighted it with the green. The fox stood there in the middle of the beam several seconds and turned, when my daughter made a noise... too bad I didn´t have my shotgun at hand:-(

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SHOOTER, this is how it looks to both dogs and humans when all the lights are off! If any of you have any other questions, I'll be glad to help out.

post-7794-0-85262700-1388340817.jpg

post-7794-0-85262700-1388340817.jpg

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Any light you "hit" an animal with is likely to spook it and scare it off. You need to bring the light slowly down or over to the animal. Don't just "turn it on".

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What Bobcat says! Pick 'em up in the lume and then keep 'em there as they track in. If you can see them well enough to take a shot just using the lume, then do it. If you have to bring the light full on, be ready to shoot quickly, because they may bolt.

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Red light will not affect a humans night vision, Green light will affect a humans peripheral vision for about 30 minutes afterwards and make it harder to pick up animals.

white light will completely destroy a humans night vision for 30 to 45 minutes.

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SHOOTER, this is how it looks to both dogs and humans when all the lights are off! If any of you have any other questions, I'll be glad to help out.

post-7794-0-85262700-1388340817_zpsb7780

 

I'm curious as to how often that happens?

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I'm not an expert by any means.

 

Charles Shawley PH.D. published this in Predator Extreme in a 3 part series late in 2008 and early 2009.

Here are the links to the articles:

 

http://www.predatorxtreme-digital.com/200810#&pageSet=40

 

http://www.predatorxtreme-digital.com/200812#&pageSet=31&contentItem=0

 

http://www.predatorxtreme-digital.com/200902#&pageSet=42&contentItem=0

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