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Reloading Question

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Ok I am a newbie on reloading, been gathering my stuff. Lee Classic 4 turret, 9MM dies, Brass, Bullets (115 Grn lead round nose .356) (115 Grn FMJ .355) thanks to AR Patriot I was able to buy some small pistol primers, Win 231 powder, was at Cabelas and picked up some HP-38 and some Win WSF which I was told mimics 231. Looking at my Lee reloading manual and HP-38 is listed as well as Win 231 for Lead RN 155 grn. Neither powders listed for 115 Grn FMJ. WSF not listed anywhere. Looked up load data on this web site thank you very much as there is a wealth of knowledge there. It list WSF for the FMJ. My question is would there be away to use 231/Hp-38 for 115 FMJ, or are bullet types/grains that powder specific. For instance 100 Grn 9mm FMJ .355 231/Hp-38 is listed in the Lee Manual but not for 115 Grn. :unsure: Thank you in advance for any help :wub: Dang I miss the good ole days with my old Lee pound it on the table reloading die :rolleyes:

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you can also get good info from the Winchester site. just look for reloading data on the home page. Also,Cast Boolits has a lot of experienced guys who post pet loads,but beware,they are not verified by anyone other than the guy posting. Also,Accurate Reloading site has tons of good info. Feel free to call me, I have several books,including the Lyman cast bullet manual and I have a friend around the corner who has bunches of manuals,some go back 50 yrs or better.

Patriot

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Just as a little bit of extra info, most powder manufacturers provide data based on the bullets weight, not so much their construction or composition. This is due to the nature of the rate of burn for the powder and the corresponding pressure spike that is produced by the expanding gas created by the ignition of the powder by the primer within the specific cartridge case. A bullet must overcome inertia quickly and travel free of the barrel if it is to be consistently accurate. If the pressure spike is too fast and the bullet is not able to move quickly enough, the you have pressure issues with your load....and possibly an explosive situation. Think of it this way. If a bullet is relatively "light" for its caliber and case dimensions, then a faster burning powder can safely be used as long as it remains within the mfg's guidelines. Heavier bullets, by caliber/case, require more effort to overcome inertia and need time for the powder to completely burn and produce a safe uniform pressure spike so they tend to utilize a powder with a much slower rate of burn . This case - caliber - powder relationship can be a little confusing, esp. when you compare bottleneck magnum cartridges to straight walled dangerous game rounds. Take a 7mm Rem Mag vs a 458 Win Mag. In the 7mm RM, you would use a very slow burning powder like IMR 7828 whereas in the 458 WM, you would use a faster burning powder like IMR 3031, even though the projectile in the 458 WM weighs 3x the projectile in the 7mm RM. Luckily, pistol cartridge reloading seems a little more strait forward.

 

All that as a round about way of saying that bullet manufacturers will often provide load info for their own specific bullet of a given weight but that information "might" be easily applicable to a bullet of the same weight manufactured by a different company. One would, of course, want to use the specific information provided by the manufacturer of the bullet you are using to be sure.

 

Here is a link to a chart that shows the relative burn rates of most reloading powders.

 

http://varmintal.com/pburn.htm

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Thanks for the information. I loaded my 1st 9mm ammo. I loaded 50 total. Using load data from Winchester 115 Grn FMJ using WSF powder had a minimum 4.9 grs to a max load of 5.7 grs powder. Using my new Lee 4 turret I set all of the dies and loaded a few dummies and measured cartridge length against a factory round of the same bullet. Once that was dead on I then set the auto powder charge till I was a consistent 5.0 with an occasional 4.9-5.1. I then took my clean brass de-primed-re-primed then I zeroed my scale set the case on it measured weight charged it with powder and set it back on the scale to measure the amount of powder. I did this for the 1st 25 and all but two was at 5.0 with one 5.1 and 1 at 4.9. I then weighed every 5th one till I hit 50. Every one was tested for proper length. I finally got to shoot them and I had no feed issues, ejection issues, everything worked great with the exception I did have one FTF. I am shooting a S&W SD9VE. I haven't diagnosed the FTF but I will pull the bullet. I think I might have got one of my dummies in the box but I will know when I get time to look at it. Overall I was very pleased with my 1st run. Thanks AR for turning me onto your powder lady. Now I need some 4 turret press disks so I can set up some other calibers. Going to leave this set as is.

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I haven't diagnosed the FTF but I will pull the bullet. I think I might have got one of my dummies in the box but I will know when I get time to look at it.

 

Ah, the Devil is in the details. Reloading, esp. with pistol ammo due to the ease at which a double charge of powder can go unnoticed, has the potential to be very dangerous. One must be ever diligent to possible screw ups. Might I suggest that if you do not yet own a bullet puller, even a cheapo kinetic one, then invest in one immediately. If you even suspect that there may be something wrong with your load, even the slightest doubt, take it out of the production line and pull the bullet immediately. The time you spend reloading a perfectly good load that you just pulled is minute compared to the rest of your life dealing with an injury because you were too lazy or over-confident to check a potential bad round. Your hands, eyes. and guns will thank you.

 

BTW, if you will load dummy rounds WITHOUT a primer in them, you will pretty never much have a FTF or misfire with one of them. Primer-only rounds can be a real hazard as sometimes there is enough energy in the primer to expend the bullet up into the barrel where it can become lodged. If it goes far enough up the barrel, there is the chance it will not be discovered and one could fire a full pressure round right behind it with disasterous results.

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I have a Bullet puller and I did pull the bullet and the cas was charged, so maybe it was a bad primer or something.

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Probably so. I know when I first started reloading, I was a little heavy on the reloading lube and careless where it went. Having it all over my hands and then handling primers cost me many a dud until I realized what the issue was. I thought the fact that my shooting buddy only touched his primers with tweezers was a little "over the top" until I found out he has never had a FTF with one of his reloads. Ehh, ya live and learn.....

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