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Boomy

New gas forge...... well kinda

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Three years ago I built this forge but never finished assembly or ever lit it. After reading Sticshooters post yesterday on "Resurected Blades" I finally got of my butt and finished it.

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:):) I even got my first file blade hammered out and annealed.:):)

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Honestly my goal has been to build one for the Rondi. I've had the design floating in my head since the last one, but this year has been all kinds of nuts for me. I'm a month and a half behind at the plant and about six behind on personal projects. ( a couple of which are for Posse members. Sorry guys)

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Good looking forge Boomy. bowingsmilie.gifGive us some details on how you made it. burner? insulation?temps?size? more pics. I have started making my burners but have not gotten to the forge itself. New ideals always welcome. biggrin.gif

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Yeah! Andy's request goes for me too! I've got everything I need to make one.... except the most important thing, a good design!

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OK. The design is one of a couple designs that I stole offline.:biggrin:

This one is made out of an old freon can. I cut off the section that held the handle with a tourch and while I was at it I cut a hole for the inlet. I used a sch.80 nipple because it was handy and it will hold up to the heat longer. The washers welded around it are for a heat sync to disipate heat before it can get to the burner itself. The feet are unistrut to also act as a heat sync to keep from burning what ever it is sitting on. The tank is lined with KAO Wool. I don't know were a normal person would go to get some. Possibly Grainger? Another option is to line it with "refractory cement" (just do a Google search). I think it would be more effective though less insulating than the KAO Wool. I set in a firebrick to lay the stock on. I got it at our local fireplace/grill store.

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Sorry for the crappy image, but right now paint is all that I have to work with.

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Side view. You can see the heat syncs.

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Basic propane burner. Just light it and slide it in the pipe. Originaly I had planned to suspend it off the walls with screws threaded through the sidewalls of the pipe, but it turned out to be unneccesary.

 

The unit burnt fine. It heated up the blanks fine and after a while it had the brick glowing orange. The actual temp? I have no idea, but i reached a proper orange that I like for my smithing.

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Thanks Boomy! I might try the second one as I've got some fire bricks in my shed. I was thinking, you (being as how it's you) you could call the first rig TEST TOSTER ONE! :D :D :D

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I think I like the top one better Boomy. The one I was thinking about making has three burners. Are you telling me that I don't need that much heat. What is the largest piece of metal you think you could heat in that forge? Think you could hammer out some damascus in that thing?smiley-leering-yellow.gif I have seen them made with KAO wool and it works real well. It also used a layer of refractory cement on top of the wool as a protective coating. Worked pretty well and you did not snag on the wool as you were pulling the metal out or putting it in. It also used the tunneling effect of the burner like the one you built with the burner offset but it was built vertical. I think I like the horizontal approach better. biggrin.gif

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Propane burns at 2800*F. How well can you retain the heat before it disipates? In a coal forge you put the stock into the coals. The stock is surrounded by the heat. With a acetylene torch you can apply a whole heck of a lot of heat with crappy and uneven coverage. Propane torch by itself won't work because the heat disipates too fast. 2800*F is enough for blade work. The thicker the stock the longer it with take for the energy to get to the center of the stock. Especialy if it is thick.......

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