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Advice for coon calling


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#1 OKyotee

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Posted 21 July 2006 - 03:25 PM

Hey guys I am relatively new to predator hunting, and am looking for the best advice you can give on calling coons. I have alot of areas to hunt were I know the is a good population of coons living. I am going to try to go hunt specifically for coons very shortly. Hopefully I can get some more yotes in the process, but really want to call in a coon. I do not have a electronic call as of right now so I am limited to a handcall for the sounds I can produce, but I am going to build an e caller soon. Any advice would be greatly appreciated

#2 gscheig

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 07:42 PM

Hey guys I am relatively new to predator hunting, and am looking for the best advice you can give on calling coons. I have alot of areas to hunt were I know the is a good population of coons living. I am going to try to go hunt specifically for coons very shortly. Hopefully I can get some more yotes in the process, but really want to call in a coon. I do not have a electronic call as of right now so I am limited to a handcall for the sounds I can produce, but I am going to build an e caller soon. Any advice would be greatly appreciated


Just use a rabbit distress - jack or cottontail

Coons usually show up first for the easy pickings...

#3 Benoh23

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 09:34 AM

Buy you a Psycho Tweety call and learn to do a woodpecker. I called 3 to the pickup Sunday night. Works great.

#4 OKyotee

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 11:12 AM

Thanks guys for the advice anything else you can think of would be greatly appreciated. Haven't called any coons in yet, for one simple reason its to hot to go hunting right now. I've made a few stands close to home right before dark but haven;t had any luck on anything in the last month.

#5 scruffy

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 11:59 AM

I picked up the Johnny Steward coon calling CD. Has 4 sounds on it, raccon fight (supposed to be good during the mating season), squealing bird, and a couple others I can't remember off the top my head.

This is going to be my first year calling raccon also. I've been doing some scouting and have some located once season opens up here.

later,
scruffy

#6 Cdog911

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 06:11 PM

OK,

I gave a demo at the recent NTA Convention up here in Kansas on this very subject. Convenient was the fact that I had the chance to meet and visit with the guys from Minaska Outdoors whose Minaska Bandit specializes in calling coons. As an aside, they have a great DVD coming out called "Crumbling Coons" that shows the technique very well. Also, Trapper & Predator Caller's new magazine dedicated totally to calling predators, Predator Hunting, has a new issue due out in the next couple weeks with a feature story by me outlining this technique.

Calling coons is much, much easier than calling bobcats. A regular old rabbit distress call will bring them in with an inquisitive posture and can take some time, much like a coyote or 'cat. If you want smash-mouth, in your face calling action, though, you need an e-caller and at least one good coon fight type sound. I use the Johnny Stewart Prey Master caller, upgraded with a NADY remote unit, and the JS Raccoon #1 card that features the raccoon fight, raccoon and squealing bird, meadowlark and raccoon and grey fox.

It has been our experience that the raccoon fight brings in adult coons more readily than smaller, younger coons, most likely because of the intimidation factor. If you're after any coon, we start with the raccoon and squealing bird, then progress to the raccoon fight.

Calling coons in the daytime is exciting and I liken it to squirrel hunting on crack. Set up downwind or crosswind from a den tree where you can see the den hole. Place your caller or speaker on the opposite side of the tree and get yourself into position. We've found camo to be effective and ofttimes necessary because you're right there in their mustache, often less than twenty yards from the base of the tree.

Before you hit the "go" button on the caller, have your gun shouldered and the bead or crosshairs on the tree because the coon will often appear literally within seconds of activating the caller. And I mean seconds. Most stands for coons last less than a minute, and setups can be made every 50 yards down the riverbend - no need to drive a mile worrying about those proverbial virgin ears. Be sure the coons completely clears the hole with no threat that they'll fall back in or climb in after you shoot.

I emphasize the use of an e-caller when using coon fighting sounds for reasons of safety. A coon inspired to respond to a territorial threat is a bad mama-jama and, quite frankly, is coming to kick somebody's butt. The last place you want him focused is your upper lip. I do not worry about being attacked by coyotes, or even bobcats in most calling situations. Coons, on the other hand and in my opinion, would have no hesitations about taking you down. I've seen them bail out of trees thirty feet high because they were so p'ed off at the intrusion of fighting coons that they wanted a route shorter than actually climbing down. Once you call one, you'll see what I mean.

As far as guns to use, the .22 mag is best because it has enough punch to anchor an enraged coon. Lacking a .22 mag, we use .22 LR semi-autos and 12 gauges. I emphasize semi auto because a bolt gun will just get you hurt. My partner and I set up with one using the rifle and the other with the 12. If the coon comes out slow and cautious, the .22 is used for a head shot and the 12 is used just in case he isn't dead enough when he hits the ground. As is often the case, though, the coons will erupt from the tree and all heck breaks loose. This is when the 12 shines. have you ever tried to lead a flying coon as it falls straight down? Ain't so easy.

Anyway, give it a try, feel free to ask questions and be ready to have a blast because t this type of calling will almost make you forget coyotes. LOL

#7 OzarkCharlie

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 07:05 PM

CDog
Really good info. I am looking forward to your article. Do you know when it will be out.
OC
In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.--John Adams

#8 Jeff W

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 10:59 PM

We have alot of luck with coons on the woodpecker sounds and also taking the reed out of the Burnham Brothers Mini Blaster and using it as a stand alone call works majic.

#9 Cdog911

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 06:56 AM

OC,

My editor advised me Friday that my advance copies were in the mail. I replied to ask for a release date but didn't catch him in the office. I hope to have that information on Tuesday and will post it on those boards that allow me to do so ASAP.




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